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“Constant Evaluation” – Article in “Die Presse”

I was recently interviewed for a commentary on the subject matter of constant peer evaluation, a practice on the rise in several organizations. Here is the link (the article is in German, though!).

By the way, this is linked to a talk I will give at the upcoming Personal Austria conference for HR; expect another post on this!

The Writing Workflow: Pick a project to focus on

I am currently musing with applying a more stringent framework on my publication efforts. This ties into the debate of systems vs. goals and–if nothing else–should outsource some of the more mundane work to checklists and trackers.

Productivity can usually be increased tremendously by having one focal project. With such a laser-like focus, we do not need so much time changing tasks or projects; we might not even need a todo-list, as the project is so present in our mind.

This begs one question: what project to start with? There might be different points to look at, such as general importance of a particular paper, the estimated impact it has, the difficulty of analysis, etc. The number one decision-criteria, however, is more process focused: pick the lowest hanging fruit first. The idea behind this simple recommendation is that you get the projects that you can finish relatively quickly out of your way. Then focusing on particular projects will be even easier for you.

So how to choose which one to work on once you find time? To aid with that question, I designed a simple spreadsheet that can be used as a tracker for your research projects. The general rule here is that the farther to the right your status bar goes, the “lower the fruit is hanging”. So just screen your tracking sheet from the right to the left and handle the papers in the order they appear! In brief, this gives priority of requested revisions over editing your drafts, and of editing your drafts over drafting new text.

Article Published: Development and validation of a scale measuring approaches to work-related informal learning

My article “Development and validation of a scale measuring approaches to work-related informal learning” has been published in The International Journal of Training and Development.

Abstract

Social approaches to work-related informal learning, such as proactive feedback-seeking, help-seeking and information-seeking, are important determinants of development in the workplace. Unfortunately, previous research has failed to clearly conceptualize these forms of learning and does not provide a validated and generally applicable measurement instrument. We set out to develop and validate such a scale measuring social approaches to work-related informal learning. We collected data in four organizations in Austria and the Netherlands, with a total sample size of 895 employees. These data were used to conduct exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, which showed four distinct factors: feedback-seeking from the supervisor, feedback-seeking from colleagues, help-seeking and information-seeking. In conclusion, the scale we developed is valid in a range of contexts and thus is an appropriate tool for research as well as human resource development practice.

Cite as

Froehlich, D. E., Beausaert, S., & Segers, M. (2017). Development and validation of a scale measuring approaches to work-related informal learning. International Journal of Training and Development, 21(2), 130–144. doi:10.1111/ijtd.12099

AERA International Travel Award

I am honored that AERA’s International Relations Committee has found my four contributions to the AERA General Meeting 2017 worthy for recognition! The respective AERA International Travel Award was awarded to me on 28.4.2017 in San Antonio, TX.

Toastmasters Conference in Vienna

On April 22, I organize the Toastmasters District 95 Division D Spring Conference in Vienna. From 10:00 to 18:00, Toastmasters and guests from Austria, Hungary, Slovenia and other places are gathering to compete in the Evaluation and International Speech contests (the “World Championship of Public Speaking”), to learn, and to have fun.

Please use this link to register: https://sites.google.com/view/d95conf

I hope to see you there!

Relationships matter.

I gave a talk at the Future of Work Congress for HR professionals in Stegersbach, Austria about the use of  social network analysis as a tool to facilitate social learning and innovation. You can find information about that conference here and here.

Paper published: Development and validation of a scale measuring approaches to work-related informal learning

My paper “Development and validation of a scale measuring approaches to work-related informal learning” has been published in the International Journal of Training and Development. You can download it here.

Abstract

Social approaches to work-related informal learning, such as proactive feedback-seeking, help-seeking and information-seeking, are important determinants of development in the workplace. Unfortunately, previous research has failed to clearly conceptualize these forms of learning and does not provide a validated and generally applicable measurement instrument. We set out to develop and validate such a scale measuring social approaches to work-related informal learning. We collected data in four organizations in Austria and the Netherlands, with a total sample size of 895 employees. These data were used to conduct exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, which showed four distinct factors: feedback-seeking from the supervisor, feedback-seeking from colleagues, help-seeking and information-seeking. In conclusion, the scale we developed is valid in a range of contexts and thus is an appropriate tool for research as well as human resource development practice.

Future of Work: Relationships matter

March 23 I will give a workshop on social network analysis for business during the Future of Work congress. Find more details about that congress and the content on the website/in the program.

Networks for Learning @ EUSN2017

Together with Marc Sarazin and Martin Rehm, I’m co-organizing a session on “Networks for Learning” at the upcoming 3rd European Conference on Social Networks (EUSN).

Abstract

This session focuses on papers that use social network analysis to understand how individuals  involved in activities related to education and learning (pupils, students, teachers, school
management, policy makers etc.) are affected by or use their social networks for educational purposes or in educational settings. The session’s papers will build on the assumption that actors are embedded within social networks which provide opportunities and constraints, in turn affecting individuals’ behaviours and attitudes (Monge & Contractor, 2003, Emirbayer & Goodwin, 1994, Borgatti & Halgin, 2011). Within this framework, the session welcomes papers that seek to make empirical, methodological and/or theoretical contributions to understandings of social networks in learning and education. These could include papers on:

  • The importance of social networks for the social and learning environments of students (Heidler et al., 2014) and educational professionals (e.g. teachers) (e.g. Rehm & Notten,
    2016a,b)
  • Theoretical processes underlying social networks, as well as the antecedents and consequences of networks (e.g. Rehm, 2016)
  • Discussions of the particularities of educational settings from a social network perspective
  • Methodological innovations for studying social networks in learning and education (e.g. algorithms to describe and explain social and learning environments, combinations of
    different methodological approaches (e.g. Domínguez & Hollstein, 2014; Froehlich, 2016), etc.)
  • Social networks of educational policy-makers (e.g. Ball & Junemann, 2012, Rhodes, 2000)
  • Other topics within the above remit

Contributions from all fields (Education, Sociology, Computational Social Science, Psychology, Organisation Science, Anthropology, Statistics, etc.) are welcome, including interdisciplinary
endeavours combining insights from educational or learning sciences with social network perspectives. The session welcomes research using qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods.

Preview: Social Approaches to Work-related Informal Learning: Development and Validation of a Scale measuring Feedback-, Help-, and Information-Seeking

My paper “Social Approaches to Work-related Informal Learning: Development and Validation of a Scale measuring Feedback-, Help-, and Information-Seeking” has been accepted for publication in the International Journal of Training and Development.

Abstract

Social approaches to work-related informal learning, such as proactive feedback-seeking, help-seeking, and information-seeking, are important determinants of development in the workplace. Unfortunately, previous research has failed to clearly conceptualize these forms of learning and does not provide a validated and generally applicable measurement instrument. We set out to develop and validate such a scale measuring social approaches to work-related informal learning (SWIRL-scale). We collected data in four organizations in Austria and the Netherlands, with a total sample size of 895 employees. These data were used to conduct exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, which showed four distinct factors: feedback-seeking from the supervisor, feedback-seeking from colleagues, help-seeking, and information-seeking. In conclusion, the SWIRL-scale is valid in a range of contexts and thus is an appropriate tool for research as well as human resource development practice.

Keywords: feedback-seeking; help-seeking; information-seeking; informal learning; learning from others

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