Author: Dominik (page 2 of 2)

Toastmasters Conference in Vienna

On April 22, I organize the Toastmasters District 95 Division D Spring Conference in Vienna. From 10:00 to 18:00, Toastmasters and guests from Austria, Hungary, Slovenia and other places are gathering to compete in the Evaluation and International Speech contests (the “World Championship of Public Speaking”), to learn, and to have fun.

Please use this link to register: https://sites.google.com/view/d95conf

I hope to see you there!

Relationships matter.

I gave a talk at the Future of Work Congress for HR professionals in Stegersbach, Austria about the use of  social network analysis as a tool to facilitate social learning and innovation. You can find information about that conference here and here.

Paper published: Development and validation of a scale measuring approaches to work-related informal learning

My paper “Development and validation of a scale measuring approaches to work-related informal learning” has been published in the International Journal of Training and Development. You can download it here.

Abstract

Social approaches to work-related informal learning, such as proactive feedback-seeking, help-seeking and information-seeking, are important determinants of development in the workplace. Unfortunately, previous research has failed to clearly conceptualize these forms of learning and does not provide a validated and generally applicable measurement instrument. We set out to develop and validate such a scale measuring social approaches to work-related informal learning. We collected data in four organizations in Austria and the Netherlands, with a total sample size of 895 employees. These data were used to conduct exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, which showed four distinct factors: feedback-seeking from the supervisor, feedback-seeking from colleagues, help-seeking and information-seeking. In conclusion, the scale we developed is valid in a range of contexts and thus is an appropriate tool for research as well as human resource development practice.

Future of Work: Relationships matter

March 23 I will give a workshop on social network analysis for business during the Future of Work congress. Find more details about that congress and the content on the website/in the program.

Networks for Learning @ EUSN2017

Together with Marc Sarazin and Martin Rehm, I’m co-organizing a session on “Networks for Learning” at the upcoming 3rd European Conference on Social Networks (EUSN).

Abstract

This session focuses on papers that use social network analysis to understand how individuals  involved in activities related to education and learning (pupils, students, teachers, school
management, policy makers etc.) are affected by or use their social networks for educational purposes or in educational settings. The session’s papers will build on the assumption that actors are embedded within social networks which provide opportunities and constraints, in turn affecting individuals’ behaviours and attitudes (Monge & Contractor, 2003, Emirbayer & Goodwin, 1994, Borgatti & Halgin, 2011). Within this framework, the session welcomes papers that seek to make empirical, methodological and/or theoretical contributions to understandings of social networks in learning and education. These could include papers on:

  • The importance of social networks for the social and learning environments of students (Heidler et al., 2014) and educational professionals (e.g. teachers) (e.g. Rehm & Notten,
    2016a,b)
  • Theoretical processes underlying social networks, as well as the antecedents and consequences of networks (e.g. Rehm, 2016)
  • Discussions of the particularities of educational settings from a social network perspective
  • Methodological innovations for studying social networks in learning and education (e.g. algorithms to describe and explain social and learning environments, combinations of
    different methodological approaches (e.g. Domínguez & Hollstein, 2014; Froehlich, 2016), etc.)
  • Social networks of educational policy-makers (e.g. Ball & Junemann, 2012, Rhodes, 2000)
  • Other topics within the above remit

Contributions from all fields (Education, Sociology, Computational Social Science, Psychology, Organisation Science, Anthropology, Statistics, etc.) are welcome, including interdisciplinary
endeavours combining insights from educational or learning sciences with social network perspectives. The session welcomes research using qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods.

Preview: Social Approaches to Work-related Informal Learning: Development and Validation of a Scale measuring Feedback-, Help-, and Information-Seeking

My paper “Social Approaches to Work-related Informal Learning: Development and Validation of a Scale measuring Feedback-, Help-, and Information-Seeking” has been accepted for publication in the International Journal of Training and Development.

Abstract

Social approaches to work-related informal learning, such as proactive feedback-seeking, help-seeking, and information-seeking, are important determinants of development in the workplace. Unfortunately, previous research has failed to clearly conceptualize these forms of learning and does not provide a validated and generally applicable measurement instrument. We set out to develop and validate such a scale measuring social approaches to work-related informal learning (SWIRL-scale). We collected data in four organizations in Austria and the Netherlands, with a total sample size of 895 employees. These data were used to conduct exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, which showed four distinct factors: feedback-seeking from the supervisor, feedback-seeking from colleagues, help-seeking, and information-seeking. In conclusion, the SWIRL-scale is valid in a range of contexts and thus is an appropriate tool for research as well as human resource development practice.

Keywords: feedback-seeking; help-seeking; information-seeking; informal learning; learning from others

Revisited Publication: Aging and the motivation to stay employable

In 2016, my paper “Aging and the motivation to stay employable” was published in the Journal of Managerial Psychology.

Abstract

Purpose – The demographic shift and the rapid rate of innovations put age and employability high on policy makers’ and human resource managers’ agenda. However, the authors do not sufficiently understand the link between these concepts. The authors set out to investigate the relationship between age and employability and aim to identify motivational mediators of this relationship. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the roles of future time perspective and goal orientation.

Design/methodology/approach – The authors conducted quantitative, cross-sectional survey research (n=282) in three Dutch and Austrian organizations. The authors used structural equation modeling to investigate the relationships between chronological age, future time perspective, goal orientations, and employability.

Findings – Future time perspective and goal orientation strongly relate to employability. The authors found indirect relationships between age and employability via perceived remaining opportunities.

Research limitations/implications – The results question the often simplistic use of chronological age in employability and human resource management research. Therefore, the authors call for more research to investigate the relationship between age and employability more deeply.

Practical implications – The findings contribute new insights for the career development issues of an increasingly older workforce. This shifts the focus from age, a factor outside our control, to motivation. Originality/value – This study contributes evidence for the relationships of chronological age, future time perspective, and goal orientation with employability. It extends literature by criticizing the prevalent use of chronological age and investigating mediation effects.
Keywords: Competences, Age groups, Older workers, Human resource management, Motivation, Career development

Cite as

Froehlich, D. E., Beausaert, S. A. J., & Segers, M. (2016). Aging and the motivation to stay employable. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 31(3), 756–770. http://doi.org/10.1108/JMP-08-2014-0224

Access

Access the publication via the publisher’s website or drop me a line.

Older managers’ informal learning in knowledge-intensive organizations

My paper “Older managers’ informal learning in knowledge-intensive organizations: investigating the role of learning approaches among Austrian bank managers” has recently been published in the International Journal of Human Resource Management.

Abstract

Managers of knowledge-intensive organizations are required to keep their knowledge and skills up to date in order to steer their companies through a volatile environment. The current demographic shift prompts the question how learning may be facilitated for increasingly older managers. In this article, we argue that the approach to informal learning at work is an important concept to predict the outcomes of managers in knowledge-intensive organizations. We set out to investigate how chronological age affects learning approaches and, in turn, learning outcomes in a sample of 139 Austrian bank managers. Results of a path analysis show that deep learning increases and surface-disorganized learning decreases learning outcomes, operationalized as performance in the last job appraisal, development of job-specific core skills, perceived career development, and subjective job performance. Furthermore, we have found that older managers more often use a surface-disorganized learning approach, which in turn leads to lower learning outcomes. In sum, this study integrates research about aging and learning within organizations and helps to explain the mechanism by which age affects learning outcomes.

Keywords: Ageinformal learninglearning approachknowledge-intensive organizationslearning outcomemanagers

Cite as

Froehlich, D. E. (2016). Older managers’ informal learning in knowledge-intensive organizations: investigating the role of learning approaches among Austrian bank managers. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 1–18. http://doi.org/10.1080/09585192.2016.1244897

Access

Access the publication via the publisher’s website or drop me a line.

There is also a limited amount of free copies available here.

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